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Keynote Speakers

Dr. François Cooren

Speech Topic:
Reconciling dialogue and propagation: A ventriloquial inquiry

Reconciling dialogue and propagation:A ventriloquial inquiry
Dialoguing is about co-orienting to various elements of a situation, that propagate themselves in what people say and do. In other words, each time people talk about an element of a situation, whether it is the weather, the economy, or the declaration of a presidential candidate, it is, by definition, a way for it to transport itself through time and space, which is the essence of propagation. Language must therefore be rethought as something that not only allows us, but also other things to do things with words. More generally, communication, whether verbal or non-verbal, must be understood as a process by which everything or everyone can always become a medium, sign or intermediary through which other elements propagate, diffuse or disseminate themselves.

Dr. François Cooren is professor of Communication at the Université de Montréal, Canada. He was the chair of this department from 2006 to 2015 and served as the President of the International Communication Association (ICA) from 2010 to 2011 (one-year term). He was also the editor-in-chief of the ICA journal, Communication Theory from 2005 to 2008. Since 2012, he has been the President of International Association for Dialogue Analysis (IADA). He was named an ICA Fellow in 2013 and an NCA Distinguished Scholar of NCA (National Communication Association) in 2017. He is one of the key representatives of the world-renown School of Montreal in organizational communication, a research movement that explores the constitutive properties of communication. His works include Organizational Discourse: Communication and Constitution (Cambridge: Polity, 2017), Language and communication at work: Discourse, narrativity and organizing (eds. with E. Vaara, A. Langley, H. Tsoukas, Oxford University Press, 2014), Organization and Organizing: Materiality, Agency, and Discourse (ed. with D. Robichaud, New York Routledge 2013), (Re)presentations and Dialogue (ed. with A. Létourneau, Amsterdam /Philadelphia John Benjamins 2012), as well as The Organizing Property of Communication (Amsterdam/Philadeplhia: John Benjamins). In his groundbreaking work, Action and agency in dialogue: Passion, incarnation, and ventriloquism (2010), Cooren proposes his theory of ventriloquism to study how interactions function. According to this approach, human beings should not be considered the only ones doing things with words. Other beings (texts, technologies, ideologies, facts, emotions, etc.) indeed participate in our conversations because we make them say things or because they make us say things, creating effects of authority and power. François Cooren has been investigating the mechanism of these ventriloquial effects in various social settings: organizations, tribunals, therapeutic sessions, board meetings, chats, etc.


Dr. Edda Weigand

Speech Topic:
Competence-in-Performance: Basic Issues for Learning Machines

Competence-in-Performance: Basic Issues for Learning Machines
There is some hope that AI and linguistics can meet, at least to some degree, if AI takes account of recent insights achieved in research on natural language use. Cartesian linguistics has come to its limits. Methodology has to be derived from the complex whole of dialogic interaction in performance according to guidelines of ‘the architecture of complexity’ (Simon 1962). First, the whole is more than the sum of the parts. Even if learning machines can now, in principle, deal with infinite components, the problem of selecting the relevant components in the actual game remains. Second, integration is the name of the game. Integration of the components, such as speaking, thinking and perceiving, has not been dealt with at all in AI so far. Third, communication can no longer be described as an exchange of information but means dialogic action in performance. Initiative and reactive actions are not correlated by topics, as, for instance, assumed by ELIZA, but by dialogic action claims to truth and volition, initially put forth and reactively referred to.

Dr. Edda Weigand is Professor Emerita of Linguistics at the Institute of General Linguistics of the University of Münster, Germany. She is Honorary President and Founding Vice-President of the International Association for Dialogue Analysis and has been elected Assistant Secretary-General in the UNESCO FILLM Committee in 2017. She writes and edits many articles and books on dialogue theory, pragmatics, speech act theory, lexical semantics, rhetoric, culture and other topics, with a strong voice that language is first and foremost human activities, with purposes, functions, and wills to embedded in specific situations to render them meaningful, rather than simply sentence exchanges and usages. This dialogic turn after the shift to pragmatic paradigm is best explained in her 2009 (Amsterdam/Philadeplhia: John Benjamins) book, Language and Dialogue: From Rules to Principles of Probability, in which Weigand proposes a holistic way of understanding human communicative competence which is generative, rather than reductive, from an open system made out of chaos and orders in daily interactions with different systems. From this dialogic vein, she proposes her question to the normative AI studies and urges an interdisciplinary approach to bridge between AI studies and linguistics.  Her most recent books are: From Pragmatics to Dialogue (2018), ed. by Edda Weigand and Istvan Kecskes, The Routledge Handbook of Language and Dialogue, ed. by Edda Weigand (2017) and Dialogue: The mixed game(2010), all published by Amsterdam/Philadeplhia: John Benjamins. She is chief-editor of the journal Language and Dialogue (Benjamins) and chief-editor of the series Dialogue Studies (Benjamins).


Dr. Doobo Shim

Speech Topic:
The Global and Asia: Media Flow and Publicness

The Global and Asia: Media Flow and Publicness
As witnessed by the recent global popularity of South Korean culture and increasingly multilateral, although uneven, exchanges of Japanese, Taiwanese, Hong Kong and Chinese products in the region, media internationalism has been strongly manifested in Asia. On the other hand, amidst the commercialization of media, there is a concern that the media publicness is being shrunk. By critically reflecting on the production, distribution, and consumption of the Asian media culture, this talk shall discuss ways to encourage neglected voices to be heard in future media contexts and cultural realities.

Dr. Doobo Shim is professor of Media and Communication in Sungshin University, Korea. He is one of the earliest and most important scholars studying K-pop and Korean Wave that was first an East Asian phenomenon in late ’90s, and later a global sensation in past decade. Taking an approach intersecting cultural studies and political-economy, Shim is able to explore both the liberating and stifling effects of cultural industry and global pop culture flow in East Asia. In tracing back the rise and development of Korean’s successful case of indigenizing Western forms of entertainment into its own modern cultural expression that is enthusiastically embraced by its neighboring countries, Shim provides political and economic references on how an Asian cultural industry can thrive, and what content elements are cross-culturally related to in this case. His English works include: Filling the void: the research of Korean Wave (Hanllyu) fandom (2015), Pop culture formations across East Asia (2010, ed. with Ariel Heryanto and Ubonrat Siriyuvasak), Wither the Korean Film Industry? (2011), Hybridity and the rise of Korean pop culture in Asia (2006).

 

Audrey Tang

Speech Topic:
台灣社會創新發展趨勢 Trend and development of social innovation in Taiwan

台灣社會創新發展趨勢 Trend and development of social innovation in Taiwan
coming soon!

Audrey Tang is Taiwan’s youngest and first transgender government minister since she enters the Cabinet in 2016. She is the Cabinet’s digital minister in charge of Taiwan’s engineering of digital democracy and social innovation, setting up platforms for civic participation, leveling-up government transparency, and encouraging start-ups especially in high tech sectors such as virtual reality and internet of things. Tang focuses on software freedom as the foundation for innovation and seeks to advance Taiwan’s sharing economy into “a free exchange of resources across industries.” Before entering the Cabinet, Tang was already a successful entrepreneur in Silicon Valley. After retiring, she and other open source community hackers form g0v.com, which is an on-line community developing information tools and platforms that push for government transparency and citizen participation. The community still holds hackthon every two months. In these activities, coders, programmers, project managers and other people who are relevant to software development work together several days to create and finish a specific project, practicing a thinking process through dialogue that is very much like what David Bohm (2014, 1996) had proposed.